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All Posts Tagged: dental care

Your Smile After Graduation

Having the best smile on campus

Of all of life’s transitions, perhaps one of the most monumental is when a young person graduates high school and enters the “real” world for the first time. Adjusting to life as an adult can be exciting, but it’s important to keep your well-being, including your dental health, a priority.

If you’re starting college, your teeth are an important part of your life and even your future career. Here’s how to keep your smile in the best shape possible.

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Pediatric Dentistry Rockwall

Dear Tooth Fairy

Do you recall visits from the Tooth Fairy as a child? Children are often so excited about losing a tooth, because they know a visit from the Tooth Fairy is imminent. Traditionally, the Tooth Fairy takes children’s lost teeth from under their pillows as they sleep, replacing it with money. Some children even have special boxes, pillows, or stuffed animals designed to keep the tooth safe while it awaits its collection from our fictional flying friend.

Although the Tooth Fairy is relatively new to human traditions, people from all cultures have been celebrating or commemorating the loss of children’s baby teeth for centuries, according to The Salon. Some ancient cultures would bury, hide, or even burn the lost teeth as part of a cultural ritual. And although her exact origins are unknown, she is a common figure in well over 90 percent of American households, according to one survey.

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5 Things You Didn’t Know About Gum Disease

When people think of dental care, they often think of teeth. But healthy teeth are only part of the equation. The tissues and bone that surround your teeth, including your gums, are critically important to your overall dental health.

You may be thinking, “There’s no way I could have gum disease. My mouth feels fine.” But gum disease  often shows no obvious symptoms and doesn’t cause pain – so many people have it and don’t know it. Nearly half of adults age 30 or older have some form of periodontal (gum) disease. And, nearly 70 percent of adults age 65 and older have it, according to the CDC.

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Your Heart Loves Your Dentist

You know you should take care of your teeth to prevent problems like cavities and bad breath. Perhaps you brush your teeth quickly each morning as part of your routine, but don’t think much about it. You may assume that as long as your teeth don’t hurt, you don’t need to worry too much about your dental health.

But your dental health affects your overall health. In fact, for some people, it may even be the difference between life and death. That’s because recent studies have shown that poor dental health may increase your risk of heart attack, stroke, and other cardiovascular problems.

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New Year, New Smile!

Each January, millions of people resolve to change their lives for the better in the new year. Often, their goals involve losing weight, getting more exercise, or similar healthy habits.

But there is one resolution that could truly improve your health and your life in many ways – no gym required. It’s a resolution for good dental health.

Not only can a healthy mouth improve your physical well-being, but it can also give you more confidence to help you achieve other positive change in your life. Are you giving your mouth the respect it deserves?

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What is a Root Canal?

A Root Canal is a method in dentistry also known as “paying off the nerve”. In the Root Canal process the vascular nerve blocks inside the tooth causing enormous pain is extracted to avoid further suffering of a patient. With specialized equipment, teeth and gum area are cleaned achieving infection-free operation. Each patient’s tooth has a lot of blood vessels that expand forming a network of sensitive nerves. A root canal is usually a simple procedure with little or no discomfort involving one to three visits to a dentist. Most patients report that having root canal treatment today is as unremarkable as getting a filling. The best news is that it can save your tooth and your smile!

What is a Root Canal Treatment?

Our participating dentists use a root canal procedure to save the damaged or dead pulp in the root canal of the tooth by cleaning out the diseased pulp and reshaping the canal. The soft tissue around the tooth contains nerves, blood vessels, and connective tissue. Years ago, teeth with diseased or injured pulps were removed. Today, root canal treatment has given our participating dentists a safe way of saving teeth.

What is Dental pulp?

The space inside the root canals is filled with a highly vascularized, loose connective tissue, the dental pulp. The dental pulp is the tissue of which the dentin portion of the tooth is composed. The dental pulp helps complete formation of the secondary teeth (adult teeth) one to two years after eruption into the mouth. The dental pulp also nourishes and hydrates the tooth structure, making the tooth more resilient, less brittle and less prone to fracture from chewing hard foods. Additionally, the dental pulp provides a hot and cold sensory function. Root canal is also a colloquial term for a dental operation, endodontic therapy, wherein the pulp is cleaned out, the space disinfected and then filled.

Why do I need Root Canal Treatment?

The simple answer is because your tooth will not heal by itself. The infection will spread without treatment. The bone around the tooth will begin to degenerate and the tooth may fall out. Pain usually worsens until you are forced to seek emergency dental attention. The only alternative is usually extraction of the tooth which can cause surrounding teeth to shift crookedly resulting in a bad bite. Though an extraction is cheaper, the space left behind will require an implant or a bridge, which can be more expensive than root canal treatment. If you have the choice, it’s always best to keep your original teeth.

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9 Foods that damage teeth.

  1. Hard Candy – While hard candies can seem harmless, eat too many and the constant exposure to sugar can harm your teeth. Hard candies also put your teeth at risk for a broken or chipped tooth. A better alternative is chewing sugarless gum that carries the ADA Seal.
  2. Ice – You’d be surprised at the amount of people that think ice is harmless. It’s made of water and doesn’t contain any sugar or other additives. However, chewing on hard substances can leave your teeth vulnerable to a dental emergency and damage your enamel. Advice: Break the habit and enjoy water in its liquid form.
  3. Citrus – The truth is that frequent exposures to acidic foods can erode enamel, making teeth more susceptible to decay over time. So even though a simple squeeze of a lemon or lime can turn a glass of water into a tasty beverage, it’s not always the best choice for your mouth. Citric fruits and juices can also irritate mouth sores. Make sure to drink plenty of plain water.
  4. Coffee – In their natural form, coffee and tea can be healthy drink choices. Unfortunately too many people can’t resist adding sugar. Caffeinated coffee and tea can also dry out your mouth, and can stain your teeth. If you do choose to consume, make sure to drink plenty of water and try to keep the add-ons to a minimum.
  5. Sticky Foods – Sticky Foods are your mouth’s worst nightmare. When it comes to picking healthy snacks, many people put dried foods at the top of their list. However, many dried foods are sticky, and sticky foods can damage your teeth since they stay on your teeth longer than other types of foods. If you do eat dried foods and trail mix often just be sure to rinse thoroughly with water and brush and floss your teeth carefully.
  6. Crunchy Foods – Who doesn’t love the nice, satisfying crunch of a potato chip? Unfortunately potato chips are filled with starch, which tends to get trapped in your teeth. If you choose to indulge in snacks like these, take extra care when you floss that day to remove all the food particles that can lead to plaque build-up.
  7. Sodas – When you eat sugary foods or sugary drinks for long periods of time, plaque bacteria use that sugar to produce acids that attack your enamel (the hard surface of your tooth). Most soft drinks, including the diet sodas are acidic and therefore, bad for your teeth. These drinks also dry your mouth out. Follow soft drinks with water and that will greatly reduce the effects of the sodas.
  8. Alcohol – Alcohol causes dehydration and dry mouth. People who drink excessively may find their saliva flow is reduced over time, which can lead to tooth decay and other oral infections such as gum disease. Heavy alcohol use also increases your risk for mouth cancer.
  9. Sports Drinks – They sound healthy, don’t they? But for many sports and energy drinks, sugar is a top ingredient. According to the American Academy of Pediatrics, while sports drinks can be helpful for young athletes engaged in prolonged, vigorous physical activities, in most cases they are unnecessary. Before your next sip, check the label to make sure your drink of choice is low in sugar. Not sure? Drink water instead!
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